Coming to America: Books Celebrating Immigrants, Refugees


We teach our students that America is a nation of immigrants, where we welcome and celebrate those with the courage to take a chance and risk everything to seek a better, safer life for themselves and their families. But as our kids hear news about travel bans, border walls, and refugee quotas, they start asking questions as they try to make sense of conflicting messages. If you’re struggling to find the best answers, books can help. We talked to Ruth Freeman, an English Language Learning (ELL) teacher and children’s author about children’s books that deal with the experience of students who are new to this country.

“Thankfully, there are more and more books exploring this topic,” Freeman says. “Not only do   they allow our ELL students to see themselves represented on the printed page, but they allow other readers to gain more understanding and empathy for newcomers. The following are a few of my favorite titles that I would like to recommend.

My Two Blankets by Irene Kobald and Freya Blackwood (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

What I especially love about this sweet story is how the illustrator has drawn the way a newcomer first hears English. There are streams of symbols and shapes coming out of people’s mouths, not sounds. A new friend teaches her words and she begins to feel at home. As the book says, “moving is hard — friends make it easier.” She slowly learns to weave her old and new cultures together until, at the end, she comes to know that no matter where she is she will always be herself.  

Joseph’s Big Ride by Terry Farish, art by Ken Daley (Annick Press)

A boy who comes to America from a refugee camp desperately wants a bike, and the girl in his neighborhood has one. There is a funny mix-up of names.  He calls her Whoosh because she rides by so fast. Will the boy find a way to befriend her and get a ride on the bike? The big, bold illustrations help tell this wonderful story about making friends in a new country.

All the Way to America: The Story of a Big Italian Family and a Little Shovel by Dan Yaccarino (Knopf)

A story told about four generations of Italian-Americans with a little shovel that was used differently by each of them. The last character in the story is the author himself! Colorful illustrations, simple text and a heartwarming message passed down to each generation (work hard, enjoy life, and don’t forget to call home) make for a wonderful picture book.

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey by Margriet Ruuis, artwork by Nizar Ali Badr (Orca Book Publishers)

A beautiful and poignant story, told in English and Arabic, of one family’s journey to escape the war in their country.  While the country is not named as Syria, the amazing illustrations are by a Syrian sculptor.  Each picture is a collage of polished stones bringing to life the parents, children and burdens they carry on their backs as they walk to a new life.  The sadness of saying goodbye, the bombs and the lives lost at sea are balanced carefully and sensitively with hopes and dreams for peace in their new home.

Other Recommended Titles:

Middle Grade

Coming to America: A Muslim Family’s Story by Bernard Wolf (Lee and Low Books)

This is the true story told with photographs of an Egyptian family and how they adjust to their new life in New York City. Readers see the three children settling into their elementary and middle schools. We see the father at his job and the mother going to school to learn English. Pictures of the family shopping, doing homework, praying, and eating dinner together give readers a real sense of what it is like for members of one family as they work hard in the pursuit of a better life.

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas (Clarion Books)

What a fantastically funny book!  Set in the 1970s, eleven-year-old Zomorod comes from Iran with her family to California and, to fit in, promptly changes her name to Cindy. After several years there, and moving four times, she has become almost a typical American middle school student, except that she still has to explain things to her parents like: snack foods, bean bag chairs and Gilligan’s Island on TV. However, when the Iran Hostage Crisis occurs, life for an Iranian family in America turns more serious. A funny, distinctive voice and original story.

One Good Thing About America by Ruth Freeman, illus by Kathrin Honesta (Holiday House)

This fictional story was inspired by my wonderful middle and elementary school students. Anaïs was the best English student back home in Congo. Here in Crazy America she feels like she doesn’t know English at all. Nothing makes sense…like chicken fingers on the lunch menu! She writes letters to her grandmother back home who tells her to find one good thing about America every day. Slowly, Anaïs does. Even while she worries about her father and brother left behind in Africa, she discovers pizza, autumn leaves, sledding, friends and teachers, until, at the end, they tell her she is one good thing about America.

Other Recommended Titles

Young Adult

Outcasts United: The Story of a Refugee Soccer Team That Changed a Town, adapted for young people by Warren St. John (Delacorte)

This is the inspiring true story of a boys’ soccer team in Georgia made up of refugees and the Jordanian woman who coaches them. Calling themselves the Fugees, the boys struggle to adjust to life in America while the town of Clarkston, Georgia, struggles to adjust to them. Many on the team have traumatic memories of the conflicts they left behind in their home countries. Their coach has to care for her players while finding a practice field, uniforms and funding. Not just for soccer fans, this is a story of hope and determination and achievement.

Something About America by Maria Testa (Candlewick)

A girl comes to America with her family to get medical treatment after she was badly burned in her home in Kosova, Yugoslavia. The story opens when she is thirteen. She has recovered but has scars on her neck that she covers with scarves. She tells her story in lyrical free verse, how she feels American, and how her parents do not. Then, an incident in a nearby town raises the issue of hatred and anger towards immigrants and she and her parents must decide how to respond. A beautiful, thoughtful story.

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon (Delacorte)

This book has everything: the two main characters who tell the story are distinctive,  appealing and funny; there is romance; and tension as one of the teenagers is due to be deported the next day to Jamaica with her family. But, on this last day, Natasha falls in love with Daniel, a Korean American. They spend one day together while she tries to stop the deportation. Telling their stories in alternating chapters, this is a touching and captivating novel.

Other Recommended Titles:



Source link

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Rolling Readers Helps Children Read All Summer Long

A group of Rogers teachers are making sure students are holding on to their brain power by reading over summer break. Rolling Readers makes stops where Tillery and Northside Elementary students live to make sure they have books to read during the summer. Alicia Copeland brought her two boys to Rolling Readers because their teachers have been so helpful teaching them to read. Her younger son is a third grader at Northside Elementary and had a really hard time learning to read. The Rolling Readers program started five years ago and stopped at just one location.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Want to Raise Your Child to Love Reading? Read These Secrets

“You’re the children’s books editor?” Someone has said this to me, usually with a smile, at least once a week in the almost three years I’ve been at The New York Times. “What a cool job!” is the subtext. But lurking in the background are almost always other questions, sometimes more pressing ones about kids’ reading in general.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

​​​​​​​The Diminishing Role of Art in Children's Lives

A wealth of research has shown a strong link between the scribbles of preschoolers and their early stages of written language and reading. Drawing also helps prepare children for success in other subject areas, including explaining and communicating mathematical reasoning, which assists in their comprehension and communication of math concepts. More generally, extensive evidence suggests that exposure to art in school has long-term academic and social benefits for kids, especially those who are economically disadvantaged.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

I Am Learning Inglés: A Dual-Language Comic

In a dual-language classroom, sometimes you're the student and sometimes you're the teacher. Here's what it's like for 6-year-old Merari.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

States' Pre-K Access, Funding Tick Upward, While Quality Varies

State preschool funding has returned to pre-Recession levels, and slightly more students are enrolling, but the quality of these programs continues to vary widely, concludes the latest analysis by the National Institute for Early Education Research.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

A Summer School Kids Actually Want to Attend

TED Fellow Karim Abouelnaga explains the importance of summer school, especially in low-income communities where students can fall months behind after summer break, and how he's working to make summer school interesting and appealing.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Graphic Novels: The Bridge Between Visual and Print Media



When words are not enough, graphics allow writers to reach new heights of creativity, experimentation, and emotion. While varying in form, the recently-published books on this list all use imagery to explore rich historical, biographical, and cultural themes and impart ageless life lessons.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

What Does the 'March for Science' Mean for STEM Education?



Scientists and educators across the country will converge on the National Mall tomorrow for the March for Science, an event meant to highlight the importance of science to society and advocate for evidence-based policymaking. The march has special relevance for K-12 science teachers, who will be well-represented in Washington and in 374 satellite marches across the country, said David Evans, the executive director of the National Science Teachers Association, which is partnering with the march.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Ex-Cop Tackles Literacy Decline in Appleton, WI



Don’t laugh when I tell you that 11 years of law enforcement experience with the City of Appleton helped me become a better public librarian. It’s true. When the director of the Appleton (WI) Public Library (APL) asked me to figure out how to reverse declining third grade reading scores in our community, I began an epic journey requiring a deep dive into my skill set as a cop, including investigative and problem-solving skills, cultural sensitivity, and a logical nature. Our target audience for improved scores was identified as Hmong and Hispanic families with children from age birth to five.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Story time goes above and beyond at local libraries



Every Monday at Mama Goose Daycare the kids line up by a window, waiting. Their smiles beam as they finally see Gretchen Boardman bringing the week’s new rotating collection of books from Paine Memorial Library. Boardman, a Library Board member, feels like Santa Claus as the children dive into the bags of books, looking for their next adventure, said Library Director Cheryl Blanchard. “The earlier they read, the more prepared they are for school," she said. "The sooner you get them hooked on books, the better.”



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Little libraries making big difference in New Berlin area



A not-for-profit that is a cross between a chamber of commerce and community club has partnered with West Sangamon Public Library to establish the book exchange called “Little Free Library” in New Berlin and Berlin. The idea is that people can take books from and return books to the exchange locations.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

The Book Problem — and One Community’s Solution



I am fortunate to spend my days teaching at Duke School, in Durham, NC, a Project Approach School* where students engage in several inquiry-based projects each year. Here students explore real-world topics, conduct research, formulate questions, and share their findings with others. We hope, of course, that they will use the skills they develop to create positive change in the world. The work that they do everyday gives me reason to be optimistic. One recent project in particular made me feel that they are on the right track.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Want to Fix Schools? Go to the Principal’s Office



Virtually every public school in the country has someone in charge who’s called the principal. Yet principals have a strangely low profile in the passionate debates about education. The focus instead falls on just about everything else: curriculum (Common Core and standardized tests), school types (traditional versus charter versus private) and teachers (how to mold and keep good ones, how to get rid of bad ones). You hear far more talk about holding teachers accountable than about principals. But principals can make a real difference.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Tool Aims to Help Schools Better Identify English-Language Learners



A team of researchers has developed a new tool to help educators evaluate the effectiveness of the surveys that schools use to identify English-language learners. The Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast & Islands' English Language Learners Alliance created the Home Language Survey Data Quality Self-Assessment to aid state education departments and school districts improve the quality of data collected through home-language surveys—questionnaires used to identify students eligible for special help in learning English—and learn more about how the surveys are administered.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Storyful’s Art and Science of Real-Time Discovery – Feedly Blog


Today, news and information comes at a <a href=”http://blog.feedly.com/2016/03/10/trend-acceleration-ideas-are-moving-faster-and-faster-can-we-keep-up/” target=”_blank”>furious pace</a>. In the wake of it, it’s become an art and a science to monitor this deluge of information, to see when something is about to break, and to know if you can trust it.

Storyful has become a leading expert Real-time Discovery—that is, the lightning-fast-paced work of monitoring and verifying the real-time web. Their 200-person global team helps news organizations and brands stay on top of current events as they unfurl.

“We discover and verify the content from social media using our own technology and open source technology [editor’s note: including feedly!], monitoring the social web in real time,” explained Derek Bowler, Storyful senior journalist and special projects lead, who also helps lead the company’s internal work flows, processes, and tools.

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly

Storyful’s ability to work together across timezones and continents is central to the value that they create. They have global offices in Ireland, Hong Kong, Australia, and New York, and each team works together in real time. “Collaboration is at the core of Storyful,” said Bowler.

Organize what you are monitoring into feedly Collection.

Storyful creates a feedly Collection for every story they monitor like Decision 2016, funny videos, cat videos, ISIS, and more. It’s an easy way for them to follow multiple sources on the same topic in one place. And when they see a Collection updating with many new articles, it often means that a new story might be breaking.

Create a diverse mix of sources with your Collections

When Storyful creates a topic to monitor, they carefully hand pick sources that include as many known YouTube accounts from that particular location, Facebook feeds from active posters, key Twitter accounts, and any relevant sub-reddits. They ensure that they have at least one feed from each channel, often many more.

“That’s a one-stop shop because a lot of things we see happening in social media are encompassed in those channels,” says Bowler. “We knew a year ago that if we were monitoring those four major social platforms effectively, we were not able to monitor the topic effectively. The best thing about feedly is that it allows you to bring it all to one place.”

When Storyful editors start to see some feeds updating with increasing velocity, they know that something big is breaking.

Create an archive

One way Storyful uses feedly is a bit unconventional: They use it as a YouTube archive that is easy for them to search through. They have over a thousand YouTube videos that they monitor. By connecting the YouTube feed to their feedly, it becomes easy for them see what is breaking, but also use search terms to find a relevant video.

Connect feedly with other open source tools

“There are a lot of open source tools that you can combine with feedly to create a really powerful discovery tool for discovery desks to minimize their workflow,” Bowler says. “I no longer see feedly as an RSS reader.”

In particular, Storyful likes to use:

  • FB-RSS – This tool creates feeds from Facebook pages.
  • IFTTT + Slack – Storyful relies on Slack for their team communication. So, they create Google Alerts that they import into feedly. And from feedly, they use IFTTT to push breaking articles into their Slack.

What do you use to monitor every day news?

Are their tools, tips, or tricks that you or your organization use to be the first to know something? Share them with us!

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly




Tags

Related Posts

Share This

How feedly Changed My Career as an Art Curator – Feedly Blog


You, our users, use feedly for such a wide range of jobs. Today we’d like to showcase a member of the feedly community who uses it as a curator of digital art, a burgeoning sector. Ryan Cowdrey, of the young startup 23VIVI.com, shows us how you can use feedly to leverage content as an art curator. He provides a guest post for us today.

My name is Ryan Cowdrey and I’m the Director of Curation at 23VIVI.com, an online marketplace that offers rare and limited edition digital art. For your enjoyment, I pose the question:

“With so much digital media content at one’s fingertips at all times, how does a creative individual discover the latest trends amongst all the noise out there?”

Being an art curator in the digital age requires strategic tools for effectively treading through the massive amount of content that we can access. Curators are relying more and more on internet sources to get content updates that they need on a daily basis. (Blouin ArtInfo, ArtNet News, Design Collector, Fubiz, BOMB Magazine, Colossal, to name a few.)

Not to mention that if you curate digital art exclusively, you are now relying solely on internet sources to get your art fix. The tools that one uses to augment their curation efforts will set them apart from the rest.

As a digital art curator at 23VIVI.com, I follow upwards of 30 big-time art magazines to stay up to date on art creation and news. After implementing feedly into my daily routine, I can now consume double the amount of content in less time.

Get our State of Content Marketing report

Pre-feedly, I was literally using an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of all the magazines that I was visiting weekly. I would record what site I was visiting, the day I last checked it, and the title of the last article, so I could pick up where I left off. Sound like a hassle? IT WAS!!!

After being introduced to feedly, I honestly lost 10 pounds of stress. It was by far the easiest, most effective tool I use to augment my career. Not only do I follow those same magazines that I was already subscribing to, but I was exposed to countless other publications that feedly offers in my space… and now they are all in one place. Along with that, I did away with the email subscriptions, which were immensely cluttering my workflow. Not to mention, I don’t risk ever missing a single article or post, which is imperative to my profession.

The typical curator goes to school to study Art History and might apprentice under a known curator until they have the skills to put on their own exhibitions.

We are in a new era of digital art, though, that doesn’t require all the technical training. One has an Art History degree at their fingertips at most libraries. Many big-name curators can be followed on social media, where you can get a feel for their curation efforts.

So, it ultimately comes down to getting your hands on lots of content, so that you can begin noticing trends, formulating hypotheses, and putting together thought-provoking collections.

On my path to becoming a “curatorial expert,” I’m relying on feedly to feed my content needs—much like Indiana Jones relied on his whip—haha! To avoid limiting my hunger for creative ideas, I use feedly’s Collection feature to break up my content and feed into various categories: Photography, Physical Design, Graphic Design, Art News, Pop-Culture, and Visual Art. This allows me to not only keep things organized but also easily pull influences from various art mediums.

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 1.23.41 AM

Because I swim through so much content on a daily basis, it is very easy to get lost in the immensity. To augment this problem I use the tag and “save for later” features to create collections of art that work well together. I can easily communicate with my team what my thoughts are on our newest curated collection and show what influences me.

With feedly, anyone with an aptitude for creativity, noticing patterns, and expressing their thoughts through creation can become a digital art curator.

Contributed by Ryan Cowdrey, Director of Curation at 23VIVI.com

Get our State of Content Marketing report




Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Five Questions With… Tanya Lee Stone (Girl Rising)



A companion to the 2013 documentary of the same name, Tanya Lee Stone’s Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time offers an in-depth examination of the social and cultural entrapments that serve as education barriers for girls in developing countries.



Tags

Related Posts

Share This

6 Great Resources to Learn about Social Selling


If you’re like us, you might have been hearing the term “social selling” at an increasingly frequent rate. We hear it at conferences, in LinkedIn forums, in team meetings, on Twitter, and on billboards.

With social experiences like Twitter and Facebook becoming core to the web, this concept of social selling has become a definitive new approach for the ways that organizations think about building relationships. It is a methodology that embraces at its center a driving belief for us at feedly: Content is a currency. That is, that high quality content is more than just an entertaining read. Content builds relationships, drives business, and steers innovation.

In fact, as we’ve talked with more and more of you as part of our regular product development process, we’ve learned that many of you are using feedly as a core content engine to drive your social selling. Many of you are using feedly as your main hub to organize your favorite sources, feed yourself with daily reading, and then deciminate the best stories to your customers.

But just what is social selling?

Social selling is the idea of using content—mostly online—to help educate prospective customers, build a relationship with them, and help guide them to a purchase decision.

Sometimes this means that sales people build personas and share relevant information through social channels like LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and more. Sometimes it means emailing interesting, relevant content to prospective customers. All of these activities overlap with a bunch of other trends that people have been buzzing about: sales enablement, employee advocacy, personal branding, social media marketing, content marketing, inbound marketing, and more.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkap9qDYnlY

 

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly

A salesperson at a content marketing company, for instance, might share content on her LinkedIn about why good content is important. Or a digital marketing firm might post about the decline of old ad formats and the latest information about the new ones.

Yes, put another way, social selling is a way to drive revenue using content.

Is it really becoming more popular?

According to some sources, yes, it is:

  • 71 percent of sales people believe that their role is changing and will be radically different in five years.
  • 69 percent of sales executives believe that the buying process is changing faster than organizations are responding to it.
  • 75 percent of B2B buyers use social media to be more informed about vendors.

Why? Because statistics are showing that the methodology could be pretty effective.

  • 98 percent of sales reps with more than 5,000 LinkedIn connections meet or surpass quota.
  • 40 percent of salespeople have closed two to five more deals per year as a result of social selling.
  • Bain & Company found that a 12 percent increase in brand advocacy generates 2X increase in revenue growth
  • 73 percent of salespeople using social selling as part of their sales process outperformed their sales peers and exceeded their quotas 23 percent more often.

Where can you learn more?

Over the coming weeks, we’ll be exploring more about using social selling to help your business. As a starting place, here are the six awesome resources we found to go deeper on social selling. What did we miss? Feel free to share your own favorite sources (maybe it’s a blog you write!) in the comments below.

01 Ogilvy’s Report on Social Selling

02 Hootsuite’s Art of Social Selling

03 Salesforce’s mini-guide to social selling

http://www.salesforce.com/uk/socialsuccess/social-sales/mini-guide-to-social-selling.jsp

04 Aberdeen Group’s research brief: “Social Selling: Leveraging the Power of User-Generating Content to Optimize Sales Results”

https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/business/sales-solutions/global/en_US/site/pdf/ti/linkedin_social_selling_impact_aberdeen_report_us_en_130702.pdf

05 “4 Ways to Boost Your Social Selling Profile (Courtesy of Linkedin)”

http://www.inc.com/bill-carmody/the-4-secrets-of-social-selling-revealed-by-linkedin-s-vp-of-sales-solutions.html

06 “The Rise of Social Selling

” by Jill Konrath

http://www.jillkonrath.com/sales-blog/bid/142711/Video-The-Rise-of-Social-Selling

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly





Source link

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Trend Report: The Rise of Live Video Streaming


We’ve been talking a lot at feedly about how trends are coming and going at what feels like a faster rate than ever. That made us think: What can we do to help you stay on top of these new ideas? So today we introduce a new series on Trendspotting—one look at something new that is changing the way we work. Are you spotting a trend that you want to know more about? Please leave us a note in the comments below!

The Trend: Live Video Streaming

In our increasingly digital and visual world, businesses across industries are fighting attention amidst the noise. Video as a medium has become one of the most effective ways to stand out and connect with an audience. Video quickly conveys meaning and emotion. It’s memorable, and it catches the eye in a sea of text and static images.

To hit home the growing popularity of video: Over one billion people use Youtube (that’s almost one third of all people on the internet), and the number of daily Youtube viewers has increased 40 percent since March 2014.

Accordingly, many social media sites like Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook have integrated some form of video content on their platforms. Additionally, new social media platforms have recently emerged that feature video as the central medium for interaction.

More and more, brands are recognizing the value of video as an online marketing strategy. Demand Metric completed a survey of 398 marketing, sales, and business professionals which revealed that 69 percent have used video marketing and another 31 percent are planning to. A recent study of 200 executives by Brandlive found that 44 percent held a live streaming event in 2015 and 39 percent believe live streaming video will be important to their marketing efforts going forward.

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly

The video trend is growing alongside the surging smartphone use trend, as more and more people use phone cameras. Daily mobile internet usage continues to grow year by year, on a global scale. Of all mobile traffic, online video now accounts for upwards of 50 percent.

The prevalence of both video and smartphones have paved the way for newer social platforms centered around live streaming video, like Periscope, Meerkat, and now Blab.

Blab.im (which is still in beta) is quickly growing in popularity. As a platform that is truly social, interactive, informational, and fun, Blab is certainly worth getting acquainted with for its many potential uses as a tool for business and marketing.

Since Blab is one of the newest of the live video trend, let’s take a closer look.

What Is Blab?

Blab.im is a live video broadcasting platform for hosting, watching, and joining conversations.

Screen Shot 2016-04-04 at 4.35.45 PM
THis is a caption

Image source: https://blab.im/about

While many have likened it to “Periscope for groups,” you can also think of it as a cross between a talk show and a webinar. It can be used for either of those things as well as casual hang outs, debates, discussions, and workshops. There is nothing quite like it on the market, although it incorporates the best components of several different social media platforms.

Anyone can host their own Blab. It’s available for anyone to watch and interact with. No professional equipment is necessary.

Blab supports two to four “presenters” at a time, displayed in a grid, à la Brady Bunch. Meanwhile, other participants can watch the conversation live on video while adding to the discussion and posing questions via text chat. The host can even pull in audience members into the “hot seat” on the live video chat from time to time, if they so choose.

After the chat wraps up, the conversation can be re-watched on Blab, and the hosts have the option to post the recording to Youtube or embed it on their own site.

Industry

Blab.im primarily seems to be used by solopreneurs and online thought leaders, discussing topics that range from sports to politics to social media trends.

Blab is also ripe for online marketers and sales departments in just about any industry. It’s ideal for brands that want to give their customers a chance to interact in a personal way, visually demonstrate the value of their product or service, or establish their brand’s expertise and thought leadership. Granted, a direct sales pitch or advertisement won’t fly on this platform. But the interactive and visual nature of Blab opens doors to a number of benefits for businesses.

Why Blab Could Change Your Business

Blab can be used for a number of valuable business functions. It shortens the distance between you and your customer and opens up a new realm of in-the-moment experiences to create. From an online marketing standpoint, it’s a great platform for developing authentic and personalized connections with clients because it is live and unpolished. Showing, rather than just telling, and being able to answer customer concerns on the spot goes a long way in developing trust and loyalty.

Here are some examples of a variety of ways Blab can be used for business:

  • Unveil new products with live demonstrations.
  • Provide group coaching sessions.
  • Conduct a Q&A session or office hours.
  • Demonstrate expertise by providing useful info for your audience.
  • Demonstrate transparency by answering tough customer questions.
  • Discuss strategy with your peers.
  • Give a behind-the-scenes experience to your tribe.
  • Network with your target audience by being a participant in other shows.
  • Brainstorm ideas with your audience, almost like a focus group.
  • Get feedback on changes you’ve implemented or ideas you’re considering.
  • Record and re-use a Blab conversation as a podcast or blog post.

Learn More

Blab.im is still in beta, so the best way to get acquainted with it is to watch shows by folks who have proven success on the platform. Here are a few to get you started:

Now is the perfect time to jump on Blab and increase your brand’s visibility while the competition is slim. Check out their Getting Started on Blab post to learn more.

Posted by Michelle Chang, feedly Contributor

Learn more about Social Selling and feedly





Source link

Tags

Related Posts

Share This